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The main reason to go to Paracas is to visit Islas Ballestas. Composed largely of rock formations and covering an estimated area of 0.12 km², these islands are an important sanctuary for marine fauna like the guanay guano bird, the blue-footed booby and the tendril. Other notable species include Humboldt penguins and two varieties of seals (fur seals and sea lions), amongst other mammals.These islands are accessible from the resort town of Paracas (near Pisco) by tour boat which typically lasts 2 hours. During the visits it is not uncommon for the sea lions to approach the tourist boats and make spectacles for the visiting tourists.

There are huge amounts of sea birds, every piece of rock is covered by them and the excrements they produce.

Guano (Spanish from Quechua: wanu) is the accumulated excrement of seabirds and bats. As a manure, guano is a highly effective fertilizer due to its exceptionally high content of nitrogen, phosphate, and potassium: key nutrients essential for plant growth. Guano was also, to a lesser extent, sought for the production of gunpowder and other explosive materials.

The 19th-century guano trade played a pivotal role in the development of modern input-intensive farming, but its demand began to decline after the discovery of the Haber–Bosch process of nitrogen fixing led to the production of synthetic fertilizers. The demand for guano spurred the human colonization of remote bird islands in many parts of the world, resulting in some of the first examples of U.S. colonialism and the expansion of the British Empire.
The demand for guano led the United States to pass the Guano Islands Act in 1856, which gave U.S. citizens discovering a source of guano on an unclaimed island exclusive rights to the deposits.[ In 1857, the U.S. began annexing uninhabited islands in the Pacific and Caribbean, totaling nearly 100.[ Several of these islands are still officially U.S. territories. Other countries also used their desire for guano as a reason to expand their empires. The United Kingdom claimed Kiritimati and Malden Island. Others nations that claimed guano islands included Australia, France, Germany, the Hawaiian Kingdom, Japan, and Mexico.There were even wars over bird sh-t.

Here the sea lions playing joyfully near the boats.

Photo Information
  • Copyright: Malgorzata Kopczynska (emka) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 12426 W: 133 N: 31930] (147505)
  • Genre: Lugares
  • Medium: Cor
  • Date Taken: 1999-09-00
  • Versão da Foto: Versão Original
  • Date Submitted: 2020-08-02 0:46
Viewed: 0
Points: 28
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Additional Photos by Malgorzata Kopczynska (emka) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 12426 W: 133 N: 31930] (147505)
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