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A Group of fishermen benefitting from the basins formed at the time of the gravel extraction in the wild Rhone, in Finges.

Why extract the gravel at this place?
Answer:
The revitalization of the alluvial zone constitutes an ecological measure of compensation to the crossing of Finges by theautoroute A9 (prolongation of the motorway which stops currently right before the forest of Finges, at the East exit of Sierre). The enlarging of the easily flooded zone by the displacement or the removal of certain dams requires the developpement of new concept of protection against the risings. This last envisages to compensate for the loss of capacity of haulage of the river, due to the partial derivation of water upstream, by gravel extraction. The extraction must allow to reduce the mean level of the current bed in alluvial zone half upstream to reduce the risks of uncontrolled overflows.
Gravel extraction must make it possible to guide the principal current whenever it would exceed the definite limits. A later raising due to the considerable contribution of Illgraben' material must be avoided. The gravel extraction must make it possible to guide the principal current whenever it would exceed the definite limits. Till 1994, the exploitation was carried out at three precise places, without definite objectives. Since this date, an output program is fixed each year within the framework of an experimental phase. In more of the fixed installations, there is now an itinerant exploitation directly taking the gravel in the bed of the river. Photogrammetric statements and a cartography of the natural values make it possible to delimit the extract ranges and to establish the catalogue of the constraints to be respected.

*Alta vista translation... I hope it means something! ;-)

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Additional Photos by Trabelsi Isabelle (ilouy) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 306 W: 212 N: 173] (3370)
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