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The Proboscis Monkey, known as the bekantan in Malay, or simply the Long-nosed Monkey. It is a reddish-brown arboreal Old World monkey that is endemic to the south-east Asian island of Borneo.
The monkey also goes by the Malay name monyet belanda 'Dutch monkey', or even Orang Belanda 'Dutchman', as Indonesians remarked that the Dutch colonisers often had a similarly large belly and nose.

A distinctive trait of this monkey is the male's large protruding nose, from which it takes its name. The big nose is thought to be used to attract females and is a characteristic of the males. The females also have big noses compared to other monkey species, but not as big as the males. Besides attracting mates, the nose serves as a resonating chamber, amplifying their warning calls. When the animal becomes agitated its nose swells with blood, making warning calls louder and more intense.
The Proboscis Monkey is endemic to Borneo's low elevation mangrove forests, swamps, and lowland riparian forests. It lives in small groups of 10 to 32 animals.
Due to ongoing habitat loss and hunting in some areas, only about 1000 are known to still exist in the wild. In Sarawak, the population of this species has declined from 6500 in 1977 to only 1000 in 2006. The Proboscis Monkey is evaluated as Endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. The Proboscis Monkey is protected by law in all regions of Borneo.

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Additional Photos by Attila Szili (atus) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 2069 W: 207 N: 4541] (15878)
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