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Old 05-15-2006, 10:30 AM
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Default Nikon D70s sensor

Does anyone know what sensor Nikon use i the D70s. I know there is multiplier of 1.5 due to the size. But is it an APS-C type sensor? How does this differ from a CMOS type sensor?

Should sensor type, effect lens choice?
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Old 05-15-2006, 02:15 PM
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Default Re: Nikon D70s sensor

APS-C I believe is the size of the sensor rather than the type.
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Old 05-15-2006, 03:03 PM
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Default Re: Nikon D70s sensor

As has already been mentioned, APS-C refers to the size of the sensor. The D70S is a CCD, which differs from CMOS, although one is really no better than the other; as with anything there are advantages to each. As far as lens choices, the sensor does and doesn't affect what lenses will work best. Newer, digitally optimized lenses should all be fine, but older lenses should work well too. If you want to know what are the best and best deal lenses, I would recommend spending some time at the Nikon SLR Lens forum at dpreview.com and find out what is hot (and what is not).
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Old 05-15-2006, 04:00 PM
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Default Re: Nikon D70s sensor

Thanks Keith & Darren.
I'll certainly follow up on that link with dpreview.
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Old 05-15-2006, 09:19 PM
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Default Re: Nikon D70s sensor

Ciao Simone

As far as I know CCD and CMOS sensors primarily differ in the way they record data. CCD sensors consume way too much of energy as compared to CMOS. CMOS are very efficient. There has been considerable research (30 years, my guess) on the CCD sensors whereas CMOS are relatively new (3-4 years of research) My guess would be that in the future we will only have CMOS sensors but right now CCD might have a slight edge due to relatively very limited research on CMOS.

I would say that CMOS are much efficient (fast and economical) especially when you want to do the slow shutter speed photo. But the quality of the image that you get might be better with CCD.
But than there is considerable noise in CCD but more uniformity. .... You see there are trade offs in both the sensor types

I recently got a Rebel XT on a 14 day trial, and I am very impressed with its low noise.

I have no idea about the APS-C type thing.

The best article that I could find on internet that dealt with issue of CCD Vs CMOS was on DALSA
Even I am very curious about this choice between CMOS Vs CCD. If you find some good technical article on it, do share them with rest of us.

ciao my friend ... if you find some interesting article on the choice of sensor, please do share it on TE. I am very confused and indecisive too.

Sarju
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Old 05-16-2006, 12:45 AM
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Default Re: Nikon D70s sensor

Hi Sarju (it's been a while eh)
This what I could find

CMOS and CCD image sensors work on the same general principle. Simply put, when an image is taken, the sensor records the amount of light entering a specific pixel. This information is converted into a digital format, stored and read back so that the image can be viewed.

The main difference between these technologies is the method used to store the image data. CCDs store charges across the chip and start reading back from one corner of the array. This provides a very detailed image, but the method is slow unless a significant amount of die area is occupied, thus increasing the cost. CMOS uses an active-pixel sensor with several transistors in each pixel to facilitate amplification and readout. The amount of usable die area is reduced when data is read at every pixel, but the CMOS device can convert the data much faster than a comparable CCD sensor.

Which pretty much confirmd your findings.

It therefore looks like the market will go in the CMOS direction but for the near future will grow side by side.

I think I have already decided though. I am going to go with CCD and go down the Nikon route. I tried the D350 (rebel XT) and found it too small and fiddly in my hands. Yet another factor to consider.....

How are you getting on with the Rebel? We all know how much Mario loves his!
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