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Photographer's Note

On my way to the University of Virginia, in Charlottesville, Virginia, I was passing by a horse farm when I spotted a group of horses in a paddock. I could not resist pulling off the road to shoot a few photos of "nature's beautiful animals." The American Quarter Horse is an American breed of horse that excels at sprinting short distances. Its name comes from its ability to outdistance other horse breeds in races of a quarter mile or less; some individuals have been clocked at speeds up to 55 mph (88.5 km/h).

Virginia was settled by the British in 1607, becoming the first of England's colonies in the New World. The early years were especially harsh, with shortages of food and skirmishes with hostile natives taking their toll. Farther north in New England, it was at Plymouth Rock, in what would become the Colony of Massachusetts, that the British settled in 1620. After the American War of Independence a century and a half later, the 13 colonies were conjoined as the United States (4th of July, 1776), with George Washington being elected the first President. There have been 44 Presidents elected in the United States, with 8 of them coming from Virginia, including four of the first five — Washington, Jefferson, Madison and Monroe. Thomas Jefferson, the third President, author of the Declaration of Independence, Founder of the University of Virginia, Secretary of State and Ambassador to France, is generally regarded as the most brilliant of the Presidents. Educated as a lawyer at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, he founded the University of Virginia in Charlottesville in 1819, and died on Independence Day, 4th of July 1826. The area around Charlottesville is regarded as horse country.

Warm regards to my friends at Trekearth.

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Additional Photos by Bulent Atalay (batalay) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 6809 W: 476 N: 12169] (41257)
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